Industry Insider

In case you hadn’t noticed, the amount of data in the world is increasing at an exponential rate. For example, every minute there are nearly 4.2 million posts uploaded to Facebook, nearly 3 million tweets, and thousands of responses to open-ended survey questions.

Cybersecurity company McAfee has a new report, Do You Know Where Your Data Is? Beyond GDPR: data residency insights from around the world, which highlights businesses’ approach to data residency, management, and protection in light of global events, policies and the changing regulatory data protection landscape.

Most of us are guilty of “data hoarding”. Without a thought, we save every digital photo, email, document, presentation and spreadsheet, losing track of what we have saved along the way. Across the enterprise, employees are blindly building a bottomless lake of data, and, in many cases, a corporate mantra of “save everything, just in case” is encouraging the behaviour.

Based in Newport Beach, California, Insurer Pacific Life has successfully used EzeScan capture technology to improve user adoption of a newly deployed OpenText content management system.

UK company Leonardo has been awarded a contract by the Commonwealth of Australia’s Department of Defence to deliver Information Management software to six Collins-class submarines operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

So, you are going digital. You have started or completed a project or projects to implement digital solutions. You and your technology partner have analysed your requirements and worked hard to test and turn on a digital platform. But what then ....

Classification deals with the categorisation of objects. In our process automation and digitisation world, we often think of the objects as complete documents that need to be classified.

Have you heard of the “ zettabyte apocalypse ?” It’s a term coined to describe how organisations must be prepared to increase storage to an additional 40 to 60 zettabytes of data (per most analysts’ predictions) over the next four years or risk being left susceptible to the type of “apocalyptic” disasters—compliance violations and fines, data loss and theft, etc.—that could run them out of business.

American GPs now spend more than half of each workday typing into computers and completing other tasks in electronic health records, according to a new US study conducted by the doctors’ association and the University of Wisconsin. The GPs complain the workload is taking time away from patient care.