Articles

For years considered a single-use accessory, the best document scanners are ready to make a story of their own.

Google, Microsoft, et al continue to perfect their search engines – but too often search is not enough. The watchword today is “discovery” – where you don’t just search for information, but information finds you.

In this article, I want to look at how a poor data culture can impact on staff in your organisation. Most of the articles I write focus on what you need to do to implement data governance, but I had such a great response to my post on why the data governance business case is so hard to get approved, that I thought it was worth delving a little bit more into the topic of poor data culture.  This could also be described as a lack of data literacy in your organisation.

As survey results pile up, it’s becoming clear Australians are sceptical about how their online data is tracked and used. But one question worth asking is: are our fears founded? The short answer is: yes.

Continuing the push to adopt the Pan-European Public Procurement On-Line (PEPPOL) technology standard for e-invoicing in Australia, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has been formally established as the Australian PEPPOL authority.

In co-operation with IDM, Information Management Solution Provider Fastman recently conducted a study to look into how companies across Asia-Pacific manage, store and protect their unstructured enterprise information. Organisations in the services, consumer, government, healthcare, financial and technology sectors were surveyed to find out the current trends for managing and securing big data.

A German real estate company, die Deutsche Wohnen SE (Deutsche Wohnen) has received the highest GDPR fine to date for ‘over retention’ of personal data, €14.5 million.

Today it costs a fraction of a fraction of a cent per megabyte to store data, but it is less than 30 years since the cost of data storage dropped below one US dollar per megabyte. It seems that one dollar was a psychologically important price point as, from then on, the world economy significantly shifted to capturing, valuing and transacting on information.

The NSW Auditor General has criticised poor record-keeping practices among of 40 of the largest agencies in the NSW public sector in its final audit of Internal Control and Governance for 2019.

Automated records and information management has been on the horizon for over 10 years, but Australian government and regulated entities are only now making their first forays into the brave new world of automated control systems.

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